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Ad Pontem – near Thorpe, on the A46 Fosse Way just north of East Stoke, Ad Pontem was a small 1st century military garrison that later became a larger defended town. The name appears to refer to a bridge over the adjacent River Trent, although no trace of a bridge has been found.
Pages 16, 30, 64, 73, 74, 116, 124, 129-137, 139, 142, 148, 149, 154, 155, 168, 170, 171-174, 183, 184, 195, 196, 227

Aslockton – village in south Nottinghamshire where a large Iron Age settlement, apparently shaped as two linked ovals with an open space at the centre, was excavated in 1992.
Pages 22, 36

Babworth – village near Retford, in north Nottinghamshire, located in an ordered Romano-British agricultural landscape known as the brickwork-plan field system which has been identified by air photography and excavations of farmsteads.
Pages 45, 51, 97, 101, 250, 257

Balderton – village near Newark through which a Roman road, today called Sewstern Lane, from Ermine Street to the Fosse Way, appears to have run.
Page 143

Barnby Moor – area of north Nottinghamshire located in the brickwork-plan field system (see Babworth).
Page 45

Barton-in-Fabis – village in south Nottinghamshire where a Roman villa mosaic was found in the 19th century at nearby Glebe Farm. The villa remains were excavated in the 1930s and then in 1949.
Pages 49, 84, 100, 124, 180, 209, 210, 216, 218, 234-238

Bawtry – small town in South Yorkshire, just over the Nottinghamshire border, which sits on the River Idle. Evidence of a north-south Roman road was found here while another Roman road ran east to Lincoln via the River Trent at Segelocum (Littleborough). Scaftworth Roman fortlet is just outside the town.
Pages 8, 17, 28, 45, 94, 95, 104, 110, 158-160, 167, 168, 174, 175, 183, 200, 258

Belle Eau Park – near Bilsthorpe. Evidence of a Roman road, apparently stretching south east to the Roman fort at Osmanthorpe and then Ad Pontem, was seen here during excavations in 2002.
Page 173

Berridge Road – a street in Forest Fields, central Nottingham, where a hoard of 186 Roman coins was found in 1910.
Pages 254, 255

Besthorpe – area of east Nottinghamshire where two apparently connected Romano-British rural communities have been excavated. One is at Ferry Lane Farm; the other is at Mons Pool quarry. Excavations at the latter site are expected to be finished in 2012.
Pages 38, 39, 44, 46, 94, 96, 106, 164, 255

Bilsthorpe – see Belle Eau Park

Bingham – market town in the Vale of Belvoir where evidence of a villa was found when a school was being built in the 1960s. The villa seems to have had trade connections with the nearby Roman town of Margidunum.
Pages 62, 64, 65, 67, 124, 130, 149, 150, 209, 210

Blyth – village in north Nottinghamshire located in the brickwork-plan field system (see Babworth).
Pages 45, 174

Bradmore – village in south Nottinghamshire which seems to have been connected by a track to the site of a Roman villa at Flawford.
Page 241

Bridgford Street – road in East Bridgford, south Nottinghamshire, which appears to preserve the route of a Roman road from Margidunum to the River Trent.
Pages 148-150

Brough – see Crococolana

Broughton Lodge – traditional name of crossroads on the A46 Fosse Way in south Nottinghamshire, close to the site of Vernemetem.
Pages 127, 128

Broxtowe – northwestern area of Nottingham where a Roman fort was found in 1937 and then covered over the following year because a new housing estate was being built. Many items of jewellery and other artefacts were found there, but there is no sign of the fort today.
Pages 18, 30, 90, 96, 102, 112, 180, 183, 186-193, 194

Bunny – village in south Nottinghamshire were a Roman well was found in the 1940s.
Page 101

Burrow Fields – traditional name for the fields around Margidunum.
Page 12

Burrows Road – an old name for Bridgford Street, East Bridgford.
Page 149

Burrow Hill – old name given by William Stukeley for the area where Vernemetem was located.
Page 125

Burton Joyce – large village in south Nottinghamshire near to which an alleged Iron Hill defended site is located.
Pages 23, 24

Calverton – small former mining town in mid-Nottinghamshire where two temporary Roman military camps have been seen from the air and two large Roman coin hoards were found in 1959 and 1960.
Pages 17, 21, 22, 30, 84, 174, 183, 196, 197-199, 253, 254

Camp Hill – hill near Kirklington, east Nottinghamshire, across which a Roman road is believed to have run.
Pages 172, 195

Car Colston – village in south Nottinghamshire where a simple farmhouse-style villa was identified in the late 19th century.
Pages 62, 115, 124, 209, 210, 216, 242, 243

Carlton-on-Trent – village north of Newark which lies within a 15km-long corridor of Iron Age and Romano-British settlements along both sides of the Trent.
Page 38

Castle Hill – traditional name for the area on which Margidunum stands, perhaps recalling the Roman fortifications that could once be seen there.
Pages 12, 64

Caunton – east Nottinghamshire village near Southwell where a tribal ‘ToT’ ring was found.
Page 75

Chainbridge Lane, Lound – site north of Retford where evidence of a Romano-British farmstead was seen in 1985 during excavations.
Pages 46, 90, 100

Clayworth – village in north Nottinghamshire through which the Roman road from Segelocum to Bawtry runs.
Page 160

Clifton – southern suburb of Nottingham where Romano-British pottery and evidence of fields were found in 2007.
Page 48

Clumber Park – one of the Dukeries estates located in the brickwork-plan field system (see Babworth).
Page 45

Collingham – village in east Nottinghamshire near Besthorpe and home to the amateur archaeologist T.C. Smith Woolley, who excavated Crococolana in the early 20th century.
Pages 17, 38, 87, 116, 119, 137-139, 146, 152, 163, 183, 255

Colston Bassett – village where the first (and so far only) public presentation by the Highways Agency about its archaeological findings along the A46 Fosse Way was made in March 2010.
Page 62

Combs Farm – elevated farm near Farnsfield which has ancient fortifications that were excavated by Sherwood Archaeological Society in 1960-61.
Pages 23, 200

Costock – south Nottinghamshire village which may be on the route of an ancient, later Roman, track from Redhill to the Fosse Way.
Page 179

Cotgrave – south Nottinghamshire town close to the A46 Fosse Way.
Pages 110, 121

Crococolana – now called Brough, this Roman roadside town on the A46 Fosse Way is close to the Nottinghamshire/Lincolnshire border and was excavated by T.C. Smith Woolley in the early 20th century. Its greatest treasure was a decorated part of a ceremonial Roman cavalry helmet.
Pages 16, 19, 40, 49, 116, 124, 129, 137-142, 159, 204

Cromwell – village near the A1 and the River Trent where the outline of a Roman villa have been seen from the air amid complex ancient agricultural markings.
Pages 22, 23, 38, 40, 143, 209, 210, 216, 217, 245-247

Crosshill Tumulus – feature near Broughton Lodge on the A46 Fosse Way that was excavated in 1947-48 by Dr F.M. Heichelheim.
Page 128

Dorket Head – hill near Arnold, north of Nottingham, where the outline of a Roman fort and a significant collection of Iron Age pottery were found by Sherwood Archaeological Society.
Pages 16, 24, 174, 198, 199

Drakeholes – small community near Bawtry.
Page 160

Dunston’s Clump – name of a Romano-British farmstead excavated near Babworth.
Pages 45, 97, 101

East Bridgford – large village off the A46 Fosse Way close to the Roman town of Margidunum.
Pages 11, 12, 16, 55, 64, 116, 129, 131, 147, 149, 150

East Leake – south Nottinghamshire village close to various purported ancient trackways.
Pages 176, 179

East Stoke – village on the A46 Fosse Way, close to Ad Pontem and where evidence of a Roman villa has been found. But best known as the site of the bloody Battle of East Stoke during the War of the Roses.
Pages 16, 75, 130, 135, 136, 143, 209

Edingley – village close to the Roman hilltop fort at Osmanthorpe.
Pages 193, 195

Edwalton – south Nottinghamshire residential area possibly on an ancient route to the Flawford villa site.
Page 241

Elston – village near Newark where Harry James lived; James was an important figure in the excavation of Flawford church and villa.
Page 242

Eltavona – fanciful Roman name for Newark devised by the antiquary William Stukeley.
Pages 142, 143

Epperstone – village which has given its name to one of two villa buildings excavated in the 1950s and 60’s between Epperstone and Thurgarton.
Pages 49, 84, 93, 97, 170, 172, 209, 211, 243-245

Everton – village close to the Lincoln-Doncaster Roman road.
Page 160

Farndon – village on the A46 Fosse Way south of Newark which antiquarians used to think was the site of Ad Pontem.
Pages 116, 129, 131, 136, 150, 153

Farnsfield – village in mid-Nottinghamshire where the outline of a temporary Roman army camp has been seen from the air.
Pages 17, 23, 30, 92, 173, 174, 183, 184, 195, 196, 199-201, 202

Ferry Lane Farm – site of Romano-British rural community. See Besthorpe. Pp 39, 164
Fiskerton – village on the River Trent which has been a contender for the site of the bridge at Ad Pontem.
Page 136

Flawborough – village south of Newark where a crushed early Christian baptismal tank was found in 1998. It can now be seen in the University of Nottingham Museum.
Page 81

Flawford – the remains of a Roman villa, including fragments of floor mosaic, were found here when members of Ruddington Local History Society excavated this south Nottinghamshire site between 1967 and 1984. A Saxon church appeared to have been built on top of the villa.
Pages 49, 84, 106, 209, 210, 216, 217, 237, 239-241

Flintham Hall – located in Flintham village close to the A46 Fosse Way. 18th century historian John Throsby mentioned that Roman coins and pottery were found in the hall grounds while Felix Oswald alleged that stones from Margidunum went into the construction of the hall itself.
Page 65

Forest Fields – see Berridge Road.
Pages 48, 254, 255

Fosse Way – Roman road notable for its length and straightness which runs from Devon to Lincoln and cuts across south east Nottinghamshire between Willoughby-on-the-Wolds in the south and Brough in the north. The road now mostly lies under the A46.
Pages 16, 30, 34, 37, 40, 49, 53, 54, 56, 58, 59, 61, 63, 65, 71, 73,95, 106, 109-157, 158, 159, 170, 174, 175, 179, 182, 204, 208, 237

Gamston – new residential area near West Bridgford where an extensive Iron Age and rural Roman settlement was excavated in the early 1990s.
Pages 22, 41, 42

Gateford – area of Worksop in north Nottinghamshire where a Romano-British settlement has been excavated. Finds included the skeletons of six stillborn or premature babies.
Pages 22, 48

Gleadthorpe – wooded area north of Warsop where the outline of a temporary Roman army camp has been seen from the air.
Pages 17, 30, 173, 183, 184, 196, 201-203

Glebe Farm – see Barton-in-Fabis.
Pages 234, 236, 237

Gonalston – a rural Romano-British settlement was excavated near this south Nottinghamshire village in the early 1990s ahead of quarrying beside the Trent.
Pages 22, 41-43, 46, 164

Granby – village in the Vale of Belvoir where a decorated Roman altar stone was reportedly found in 1812. It has since been lost.
Page 88

Gringley-on-the-Hill – elevated north Nottinghamshire village where finds have included Roman coins and a tribal ‘ToT’ ring.
Page 75

Gunthorpe – Trentside community across the river from Margidunum where a possible Roman bridge or other crossing has been suggested.
Pages 131, 136, 149

Halam – small village near Southwell close to the Roman fort at Osmanthorpe.
Page 195

Halloughton – small community near Southwell close to possible Roman tracks.
Page 170

Harlow Wood – a large bronze Roman brooch was found in this wood, near Mansfield, in the 1970s.
Page 71

Harworth – village located in the brickwork-plan field system. See Babworth.
Page 45

Haughgate Hill – steep hill on the Roman road between Segelocum and Bawtry.
Page 160

Hexgrave Park – area between Farnsfield and Bilsthorpe where a heavy Roman inscribed lead ingot was found in 1848. It is now in the British Museum.
Page 92

Hodsock Priory – well-known historic home and grounds in north Nottinghamshire which is in the Roman brickwork-plan field system landscape. See Babworth.
Page 45

Holbeck – area near Oxton connected to Thurgarton by a track said to be Roman.
Pages 170, 172

Hollinwood (Holly) Hill – old names for Dorket Head (see above).
Page 198

Holme Pierrepont – area between West Bridgford and Radcliffe-on-Trent where Iron Age and Romano-British settlements appear to have been located. An important Roman cart wheel and three ancient canoes were found here in 1968.
Pages 22, 41, 42, 209

Hoveringham – Trentside village where excavation of an Iron Age/Romano-British settlement was carried out ahead of quarrying in the 1990s.
Pages 42, 255

Hucknall – town northwest of Nottingham where, among other things, a hoard of 24 silver denarii from the reign of Hadrian were recently found.
Page 251

Kelham – village near Newark which lies within a 15km-long densely occupied Romano-British corridor along the River Trent.
Page 38

Keyworth – small town in south Nottinghamshire which appears to have been connected to the villa at Flawford by an ancient track.
Page 241

Kirkby-in-Ashfield – town in Ashfield district where two Roman coin hoards were found in the early 1990s.
Pages 252, 253

Kirklington – village near Southwell close to an alleged hill fort at Camp Hill and which appears to be on the route of a mostly lost Roman road connecting the fortress at Osmanthorpe with Ad Pontem.
Pages 172, 173, 193, 195, 224

Kneeton – village close to the A46 Fosse Way which appears to also be on the route of an earlier incarnation of the road.
Page 147

Langar – south Nottinghamshire village where evidence of a Roman villa has been found.
Pages 209, 217

Laxton – village in north Nottinghamshire, nationally renowned for the survival of its medieval strip-field system, where evidence of a Roman villa has been found.
Pages 209, 210

Linby – village near Hucknall where a tribal ‘ToT’ ring has been found.
Pages 75, 76

Littleborough – see Segelocum.

Little Morton – small community near Babworth where a hoard of over 3,400 Roman coins was found in 1998.
Page 257

Long Eaton – town south of Nottingham, just over the border in Derbyshire which is referenced several times because of its proximity to the Romano-British settlement at Redhill.
Pages 22, 68, 71, 175

Longhedge Lane – ancient pre-Roman trackway which crosses over the Fosse Way at Syerston airfield.
Pages 147, 155, 156

Lound – see Chainbridge Lane.
Pages 43, 46, 90, 100

Lowdham – large village close to Margidunum.
Pages 59, 60

Mansfield – town in west Nottinghamshire which has a museum housing a scale model of the Mansfield Woodhouse villa. A tribal ‘ToT’ ring has also been found here.
Pages 75, 76, 91, 116, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 227

Mansfield Woodhouse – west Nottinghamshire town which has given its name to Nottinghamshire’s best known Roman villa. The town was also the home of its discoverer, Major Hayman Rooke.
Pages 8, 34, 48, 49, 84, 148, 206-207, 209, 210, 211, 213, 216, 218, 219-225, 229, 234, 258

Margidunum – the largest known Roman settlement in Nottinghamshire, Margidunum is on the A46 Fosse Way near East Bridgford in the south of the county and was first excavated single-handedly by Felix Oswald between 1910 and 1936. A Roman fort here seems to have been superseded by a sprawling defended town which was occupied at least into the late 4th century. Much of the town now lies under the Margidunum roundabout.
Pages 7, 8, 11-13, 16, 19, 30, 34, 37, 38, 43, 46, 53-67, 74, 82, 84, 86, 87, 90, 91, 92, 93, 97, 100, 101, 104, 106, 107, 112, 113, 115, 116, 125, 127, 128, 131, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 153, 154, 155, 161, 179, 183, 184, 191, 198, 210, 216, 222, 242, 247

Mattersey – north Nottinghamshire village best known for the ruins of a Gilbertine Priory, but the village also lies in the Romano-British brickwork-plan field landscape. See Babworth.
Pages 45, 46

Meering – east Nottinghamshire village where Roman pottery and a coin hoard has been found.
Pages 97, 250

Menagerie Wood – area near Worksop where a Romano-British enclosure settlement was excavated in the 1980s. The finds included ancient coppice poles.
Pages 43, 46, 92, 101

Mickleborough Hill – prominent landscape feature near Upton in east Nottinghamshire where antiquarians believed a Roman road ran between Southwell and Brough. This has not been supported by evidence.
Pages 143

Mons Pool Quarry – part of Besthorpe nature reserve where excavations of a rural Romano-British settlement have been taking place. See Besthorpe.
Pages 39, 40, 41, 96

Newark-on-Trent – large town straddling the A46 Fosse Way where a Romano-British settlement seems to have developed from the 1st or 2nd centuries. Despite several excavations the town’s Roman character remains mostly unknown.
Pages 16, 28, 38, 41, 64, 73, 91, 96, 97, 106, 109, 115, 119, 122, 129, 135, 138, 139, 140, 142-145, 151, 152, 153, 170, 174, 203, 214, 215, 224, 245, 247, 251

Newstead – former mining village north of Nottingham where a hoard of 1,500 Roman coins was found in 1990.
Pages 89, 252, 253

Nottingham – although the modern county capital was not a substantial Roman settlement, some scattered evidence – coin hoards, pottery – from the Roman period have been found here.
Pages 48, 175, 200, 254

Normanton-on-Trent – village which lies within a 15km-long densely occupied Romano-British corridor of settlement along the River Trent.
Page 38

North Leverton – north Nottinghamshire village where a small cast bronze figurine identified as the mythic consort Attis was found in 1998.
Page 77

North Muskham – village which lies within a 15km-long densely occupied Romano-British corridor of settlement along the River Trent.
Page 38

North Wheatley – north Nottinghamshire village close to, or on, the route of the Roman road between Segelocum and Bawtry.
Page 161

Norton Disney – small community in Lincolnshire, close to Crococolana, where a Roman villa, with floor mosaics, was excavated by Adrian Oswald in the 1930s. Oswald found skeletons in the rubble and believed they had been the inhabitants who had been murdered by rampaging barbarians.
Pages 19, 49, 93, 97, 104, 124, 141, 141, 153, 209, 213-215

Oldcotes – village in north Nottinghamshire where a Roman villa, including a notable labyrinth floor mosaic with the image of Theseus at its centre, was found in the 19th century. The villa now lies under St Helen’s church.
Pages 8, 84, 209, 210, 217, 238-239

Old Ox – AKA Oldox, this ancient defended earthwork near Oxton, with its ramparts and entrances, is long believed to have been an Iron Age fort.
Pages 23, 200

Ollerton – former mining town in mid-Nottinghamshire where a Roman coin hoard has been found and which may have been on the route of a now obscured north-south running Roman road.
Pages 17, 44, 45, 94, 174-175, 183, 198, 248, 258

Osberton Hall – grand home in north Nottinghamshire where a Roman altar found near Segelocum was recorded as being in the possession of the hall owners.
Page 88

Osmanthorpe – area close to Southwell which gives it name to a large hilltop Roman fortress excavated in the 1980s.
Pages 17, 31, 136, 170, 171, 172, 173, 183, 185, 193-196, 200

Owthorpe – village close to the A46 Fosse Way where the otherwise straight Roman road has a noticeable bend.
Page 121

Oxton – mid-Nottinghamshire village close to the Old Ox earthwork and home of the late Tom Shipside, whose thoughts on the Romans in this part of the county are quoted in the book.
Pages 23, 170, 174, 197, 200

Pleasley – area closely to Mansfield Woodhouse which perhaps more accurately describes the location of the ‘Mansfield Woodhouse villa.’
Pages 219, 221

Plumtree – south Nottinghamshire village connected to the Flawford villa site by a bridlepath.
Page 241

Point Shallows – supposed river fording area allowing access to the Roman settlement at Redhill.
Page 176

Potter Hill – high ground adjacent to the A46 Fosse Way close to Crococolana.
Page 152

RAF Newton (and Newton) – close to Margidunum, this area appears to have supported a very large Roman villa described as being ‘remarkable’ in its dimensions. Evidence for the building was seen in 2003.
Pages 13, 61, 62, 124, 209, 210, 216

Rainworth Water – river in mid-Nottinghamshire which the antiquarian Hayman Rooke believed was close to a Roman road between Newark and Mansfield.
Page 224

Rampton – north Nottinghamshire village where a small Romano-British settlement has been excavated that, like Segelocum, appeared to have been affected by flooding from the Trent.
Pages 22, 43, 46, 164

Ranskill – north Nottinghamshire village which lies in the Romano-British brickwork-plan field landscape. See Babworth.
Page 45

Ratcliffe-on-Soar power station – coal-fired power station which occupies much of the high land where the Roman settlement of Redhill used to be.
Page 175

Redhill – large Roman settlement above the confluence of the Rivers Trent and Soar (opposite Trentlock) which seems to have had a pagan temple and a villa. Important finds here have included four curse tablets, one of which includes the – so far – only named individual from Nottinghamshire in the Roman era.
Pages 32, 33, 68, 71, 72, 73, 75, 84, 87, 90, 92, 93, 124, 175-180, 209, 222, 237, 247, 249

Retford – town in north Nottinghamshire where several important local Roman finds are housed in Bassetlaw Museum.
Pages 28, 45, 90, 166

Ruddington – south Nottinghamshire village whose residents where chiefly responsible for discovering the Flawford villa under the remains of the long demolished St Peter’s Church.
Pages 240-242

Rufford – area in Sherwood Forest well-known for its abbey ruins but which may have been close to a north-south running Roman road.
Page 174

Sawley – Derbyshire village close to Long Eaton and the Roman settlement at Redhill.
Pages 176, 180

Scaftworth (and fortlet) – village in north Nottinghamshire which has given its name to the small Roman fortlet that guarded the crossing of the River Idle at Bawtry.
Pages 104, 160, 167-168, 169, 183, 250, 258

Segelocum – this small Roman town, now called Littleborough, overlooked a Roman crossing of the Trent on the road from Lincoln to York via Bawtry and Doncaster. The town, described as the biggest Roman settlement in Nottinghamshire not on the Fosse Way, was excavated in the late 1960s by John Wade.
Pages 8, 17, 43, 87, 88, 93, 96, 97, 106, 110, 121, 158-166, 177, 223

Sewstern Lane – ancient trackway, believed to be Roman in at least some of its length, which connected Ermine Street with the Fosse Way at Newark.
Pages 16, 143, 156

Shelford – south Nottinghamshire village where Roman pottery has been found.
Page 97

Shelton – small village south of Newark where evidence of a Roman villa has been found.
Page 209

Sibthorpe – small village south of Newark where evidence of a Roman villa has been found.
Page 209

South Muskham – village which lies within a 15km-long densely occupied Romano-British corridor of settlement along the River Trent. Sign of industry were found during an excavation in 1968.
Page 38

South Wheatley – north Nottinghamshire village close to, or on, the route of the Roman road between Segelocum and Bawtry.
Page 161

Southwell – well known for its Minster, Southwell also houses what seems to have been the largest courtyard-type villa in the Midlands. Excavated in 1959 by Charles Daniels, the villa lies under and adjacent to the Minster and was clearly a luxurious building with floor mosaics, a decorated bathhouse, exterior industrial structures and retaining walls.
Pages 8, 17, 34, 49, 84-86, 106, 116, 129, 143, 169, 170, 171-173, 183, 193, 195, 207, 209-212, 216, 217, 227-234, 244, 251

Stanford-on-Soar – village in the far south of Nottinghamshire reputed to have had a Roman villa. A tribal ‘ToT’ ring was also found here.
Pages 75, 76, 209, 250

Staunton – village in the Vale of Belvoir where an impoverished Romano-British settlement was excavated by Malcolm Todd in the 1970s.
Page 46

Sturton-le-Steeple – north Nottinghamshire village close to the Roman road between Segelocum and Bawtry.
Page 161

Styrrup – north Nottinghamshire village where an Iron Age hill fort is alleged to have been located at Crow Wood.
Page 24

Sutton Bonington – south Nottinghamshire village where an urn of Roman coins was found in the early 19th century.
Page 254

Sutton-in-Ashfield – town in Ashfield district linked to a possible Roman coal source.
Page 92

Sutton-on-Trent – village which lies within a 15km-long densely occupied Romano-British corridor of settlement along the River Trent. Some Iron Age military items have also been found here.
Pages 33, 38

Syerston airfield – close to the A46 Fosse Way, the airfield merits mention because Malcolm Todd thought he saw signs of an early form of the Roman road running across it from Margidunum. It is also the place where ancient Longhedge Lane crosses the Fosse Way.
Pages 147, 155, 156

Thorpe – see Ad Pontem.

Thoresby – Dukeries estate which lies in the Romano-British brickwork-plan field landscape. See Babworth.
Page 45

Thrumpton – small Trentside village close to Barton-in-Fabis (see above) that also used to be the home of archaeologist Prof Roger Wilson.
Page 72

Thurgarton – small village near Southwell which has given its name to one of two villa buildings close by that were excavated in the 1950s and ‘60s.
Pages 49, 170, 172, 209, 216, 242, 243-245, 255, 256, 258

Trentlock – see Redhill.

Upton – village near Southwell where the earliest known Roman coin hoard in Nottinghamshire was discovered in the early 18th century. Also see Mickleborough Hill.
Pages 143, 251

Vernemetum – enigmatic Roman settlement near Willoughby-on-the-Wolds that was excavated in the 1960s. The name, and certain finds there, suggested that a temple or other place of pagan worship may have been present. Some amphorae imported from Spain were also found.
Pages 16, 71, 74, 75, 100, 103, 116, 119, 122, 123, 125-129, 179

Warsop – parish close to Sherwood Forest and the site of a temporary Roman camp at Gleadthorpe.
Pages 80, 201

Welbeck – Dukeries estate which lies in the Romano-British brickwork-plan field landscape. See Babworth.
Pages 45, 224

West Bridgford – southern suburb of Nottingham which 18th century historians such as Dr Charles Deering believed may have been a Roman settlement.
Pages 22, 48, 191

West Leake – south Nottinghamshire village close to various purported ancient trackways.
Page 176

Whatton – south Nottinghamshire village close to Aslockton where an Iron Age settlement has been excavated.
Page 22

Widmerpool – village close to the A46 Fosse Way also marking one end of the latest section of road dualling by the Highways Agency.
Pages 145, 153, 154

Winthorpe – Trentside village north of Newark which lies within a 15km-long densely occupied Romano-British corridor of settlement.
Pages 38, 146

Wiseton Park – estate adjacent to the Roman road between Segelocum and Bawtry.
Page 160

Woodborough – village to the north east of Nottingham associated with an alleged Iron Age hillfort at Fox Wood.
Page 24

Worksop – town in north Nottinghamshire where a Romano-British settlement at Raymoth Lane, Gateford, has been excavated. A farmstead has also been excavated at Menagerie Wood near the town.
Pages 22, 43, 45, 46, 89, 95, 101, 238

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